Glossary

Rationale

These terms will be helpful for your students as you progress through the Right Decisions Right Now: Be Tobacco Free program. You may wish to periodically display and review the terms on an interactive whiteboard as your students work through the program activities.

Alternately, click below to print out a list of the terms and definitions to copy and distribute.

Glossary Terms

addiction: A chronic, relapsing disease characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and abuse despite adverse consequences. It is associated with long-lasting changes in the brain.1

cessation: Quitting tobacco.2

emphysema: A lung disease in which tissue deterioration results in increased air retention and reduced exchange of gases. The result is difficulty breathing and shortness of breath.1

leukoplakia: A precancerous lesion of the soft tissue in the mouth that consists of a white patch or plaque that cannot be scraped off.3

nicotine: An alkaloid derived from the tobacco plant that is primarily responsible for smoking’s psychoactive and addictive effects.1

secondhand smoke: A mixture of gases and fine particles that includes smoke from a burning cigarette, cigar, or pipe tip; smoke that has been exhaled or breathed out by the person or people smoking; and more than 7,000 chemicals, including hundreds that are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer.4

smokeless tobacco: The two main types of smokeless tobacco in the United States are chewing tobacco and snuff. Chewing tobacco comes in the form of loose leaf, plug, or twist. Snuff is finely ground tobacco that can be dry, moist, or packaged in sachets.3

tar: A substance in some respects resembling tar; especially: a condensable residue present in smoke from burning tobacco that contains combustion by-products (as resins, acids, phenols, and essential oils).5

tobacco: A plant widely cultivated for its leaves, which are used primarily for smoking; the N. tabacum species is the major source of tobacco products.1

withdrawal symptoms: A variety of symptoms that occur after chronic use of an addictive drug is reduced or stopped.1

RDRN Glossary

download